Reporting on Weekend of Crossing Bridges With Students in Tuscaloosa, Selma

Between The Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Annual Summit in Tuscaloosa and The Bridge Crossing Jubilee in Selma, I worked with college students in crossing bridges this weekend.

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Thanks to a carefully-timed national summit for the Sustained Dialogue Campus Network and a University of Alabama field trip, I have spent the last 48 hours figuratively and literally crossing bridges with students from near and far.

As a campus partner for Sustained Dialogue, I was pleased to tell how we utilized Sustained Dialogue techniques in our classes and programs around campus.
As a campus partner for Sustained Dialogue, I was pleased to tell how we utilized Sustained Dialogue techniques in our classes and programs around campus.

It all started Friday afternoon as I addressed the more than 100 students from around the country attending the Sustained Dialogue Campus Network Annual Conference, which was hosted at the University of Alabama.

Dialogue on Bridges

What a great way to engage college students who are learning how to foster conversations that lead to inclusive environments on college campuses all around the country.

Summit attendees received these T-Shirts with a very important question.
Summit attendees received these T-Shirts with a very important question.

On Saturday, we wore t-shirts asking  “Are You Crossing Bridges”  as we participated in intensive planning and strategy sessions for introducing issues of race, gender, sexual orientation, class, religion, and ability to students in various models with the goal of enacting change.

The students attending the conference had a chance to screen the 1980s PBS documentary “Bridge to Freedom,” which was part of the Eyes on the Prize series.

Traveling to The Bridge

Then, this morning, we showed the film again, but to more than 200 University of Alabama students who were part of a caravan of buses traveling from Tuscaloosa to Selma for the 50th Annual Bridge Crossing Jubilee.

We heard speeches from those challenging us to “go beyond the bridge” and to “not stop on the bridge” before literally walking over the Edmund Pettus Bridge, the same place where voting rights demonstrators were beaten 50 years ago this weekend.

studentsSELMA
The Staff at University Programs did a fantastic job coordinating a field trip with so many students. Everyone arrived safely and made it back to our buses and home safely. Amazing feat. Way to go UP!

To see my multicultural crowd of University of Alabama students listening to the rally speeches, which were given at historic Brown Chapel AME Church and beamed via closed-circuit television out to the tens of thousands who gathered at the Bridge was something I will never forget.

Nervous as we were about taking 200 students on a field trip to a small town not used to 80,000 visitors, we were relieved that it all worked out.  Thanks be to God, we had perfect weather and wonderful interactions on the bus, during the rally and even on the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

This weekend will truly be one of the highlights of my 12 years as a resident in the state of Alabama.

Author: George Daniels

George L. Daniels is an associate professor of journalism at the University of Alabama. After spending eight years in the local television newsroom working as a producer at stations in Richmond, Virginia; Cincinnati, Ohio; and Atlanta, Georgia, Daniels moved from the newsroom to the classroom. He’s conducted research on diversity issues in the media workplace and change in the television newsroom as well as media convergence. Before going to work in television news, Daniels worked briefly as a freelance writer for The Richmond Free Press in his hometown of Richmond, Va.

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