UA Journalism Student Comments on Immigration Debate While Attending Hispanic Journalists Conference

UA Student is interviewed on her thoughts about immigration issue by KENS-TV 5 in San Antonio.

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Ellisa Bray, a journalism and international studies major at University of Alabama is interviewed by KENS-TV reporter Jeremy  Baker.
Ellisa Bray, a journalism and international studies major at University of Alabama is interviewed by KENS-TV reporter Jeremy Baker.

SAN ANTONIO– A University of Alabama journalism student is offering some insight on the ongoing immigration debate.

Ellisa Bray, a Houston native, is representing the University at the National Association of Hispanic Journalists (NAHJ) meeting here in South Texas this week.

Bray drew on her background as an international studies and journalism double major in providing her perspective on the major issue on the agenda at the NAHJ’s 30th convention.

Here’s a link to the story by KENS-TV Reporter Jeremy Baker:

UA Journalism Student Weighs on Immigration with San Antonio TV Station

San Antonio River Walk OK, but Not All That

Sorry if I’m a bit underwhelmed by San Antonio’s River Walk.

SAN ANTONIO–  What do the River Walk in San Antonio and Bryant-Denny Stadium on the University of Alabama campus in Tuscaloosa have in common?

Drum roll ……

They’re both the top tourist attractions in their respective states.

I was shocked to learn that the River Walk, which I took in Wednesday night at the end of my first day of my first visit to San Antonio, was the number-one tourist attraction in Texas.

Here's what I saw in San Antonio last night as I checked out the number-one Tourist destination in Texas.
Here’s what I saw in San Antonio last night as I checked out the number-one Tourist destination in Texas.

Really?

I mean — it’s nice and a great place to get some exercise and step away from the air conditioned convention center or hotel meeting rooms.

But, number-one in a large state like Texas?

I’m not sure this is quite the “destination” that the home of one of the top college football programs in the nation is.

I haven’t walked the entire route yet.   I only experienced part of it.   I haven’t visited The Alamo.    Maybe that’s what will seal the tourist deal for me.

Stay tuned.

 

San Antonio Express-News’ coverage of Becky Hammon Worth Going the Extra Mile To Hold In My Hand

The centerpiece on Becky Hammon in The San Antonio Express-News exemplifies the appeal of reading a national news story in the local newspaper where the story originated.

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While people could find the text and perhaps a photo with this story online, reading it as it was “packaged” “above the fold” on page A1 of Wednesday’s San Antonio Express-News was part of its appeal.

SAN ANTONIO–  Call me old-fashioned.

But I took special delight in reading San Antonio Express-News‘ Mike Monroe’s front page story Wednesday about WNBA All-Star Becky Hammon being selected as the first female paid assistant coach in the NBA.

The announcement of Hammon’s hiring by the San Antonio Spurs made national news.

The historic nature of her hire makes it a national news story.

Local Makes a Difference

But, the national media coverage (i.e. Andrew Keh’s story buried on page B13 of The New York Times) of it does not compare to the way the story was played in the paper in the hometown of the Spurs.

Along with the front page story  that included more than the expected quotes and statement from yeah management, there was Terrence Thomas’ “reaction piece” featuring Hammon’s female teammates and a perspective offered only by Roy Bragg, who’s been a Texas journalist for more than 30 years.

Those other related stories were in the SPORTS section of the Express-News.

On page A2, the paper promotes “Tomorrow’s front-page stories now available at 10:30 every night, exclusively on ExpressNews.com.

Discovered veteran sports journalism Roy Bragg while reading a print edition of The San Antonio Express-News Wednesday.
I discovered veteran sports journalist Roy Bragg’s work while reading a print edition of The San Antonio Express-News Wednesday.

Why was it important for me to read this piece Tuesday night?  I’m not sure SPEED was the motivation for me to know the story.

The perspective that only this publication provides is reason enough for it to land on my front step the next day.

And, I know the issue is not one of medium, but reader preference.

The business model doesn’t work if people like me are in the shrinking smaller and smaller minority.

But, daily newspapers all over the country are hastening their demise by making their product harder and harder to find.

Go the Extra Mile

The absolute shame is that I had to go to three locations just to find the publication.  At my hotel, I was told the Express-News delivers so few copies that if you don’t come to the gift shop within 1 hour of it opening, the papers are gone.

What’s wrong with this picture?    Is the Circulation Department at The Express-News that afraid that they will have leftover papers, so they don’t deliver many copies so they sell out in an hour?   Why not deliver 3 times as many newspapers?

I know when I’m on a plane or sitting in a restaurant, I’m usually the only one turning the pages of a newspaper while others are tapping away on their smart phones or tablets.

So that explains why this Hearst newspaper, traditionally one of the four largest papers in the state of Texas, is hard to find.

They say All Politics is Local. I enjoy reading about those politics when I visit a town in the local paper, especially when it has a national reputation.

The story in Wednesday’s Express-News about a controversial proposal to increase the storm-water utility fee was interesting to me.   It was “packaged” along with a column by David Hendricks on the BUSINESS page.

I know I’m old-fashioned.

But,  reading the local paper has an appeal that will never be replicated in an e-edition or on Twitter or some other electronic means.