Here’s Why We Must Teach All Students HOW to Blog

No I’m not frustrated.  No I’m not bad-mouthing my students online (we all know what that can do to a teacher).   I AM using this post to pose some solutions for students encouraging challenges in learning to use the blogging platform.

Earlier, I listed five problems that I’ve encountered when we require students to blog specifically in a journalism class.

THE GOAL

Ultimately, we want future full-time journalists to be as comfortable writing a quick post (not nearly as long as this particular one is) that will engage his/her audience.

My colleague, Jim Stovall at University of Tennessee, offers some great tips for Web Writing on his JPROF web site.

Here I want to offer five solutions that I think both the students in my class (and other curious readers) can try to help their students maximize this wonderful platform.

Sidenote:  I am trying very hard to keep my blog posts short.  Most of my posts go on much longer than the recommended 350 words limit.

The SOLUTIONS

Greg Screws from Huntsville's WHNT-TV shows students some of the strategies of his TV station. This kind of show-and-tell is a must if we're going to require students to blog.

SOLUTION #1:  Remember you’re writing for an audience outside of the university

Save the write-ups on graduate school readings for the teacher’s eyes only.  They prove that you read and understood an assigned article or chapter.  But, they do little to build an audience for your content online.

The purpose of the blog is not to take a boring academic assignment and dump it out here online for all the world to see.

You’re building a work habit that prospective employers are (hopefully) going to admire.

SOLUTION #2: Pick something that will attract some interest or elicit a response

We have to show our students that the best posts give the reader something to which they can respond.   Take a controversial stand and then challenge your reader to agree or disagree with you.

Stay on point and make it clear, concise.   THEN, engage them as they respond.

SOLUTION #3: Keep a digital camera handy or make your own graphics

Rather than grabbing images off the web, try to use your own photos.  Take pictures EVERYWHERE you go.  Even marginal shots are better than just text.

But, please don’t just post a big block of text and say that’s a blog post.

Yes, I know, there will be some blog topics for which you don’t have art.  But, keep those to a minimum.  My eyes (and your other readers’ eyes) will appreciate that.

SOLUTION #4:  Blog, blog and then blog some more

The only way I got somewhat comfortable in this space is to spend a LOT of time (personal time) here writing.   Doing the minimum requirement for a class is not enough.

Students reading this: I KNOW you have other classes besides mine.  Time is limited, a precious resource.

SOLUTION #5: Worry about social media later

Ultimately, I was hoping that students would integrate their blogging experience with their social media experience.   Sharing links to their posts on Twitter is a goal.

In the case of the graduate class where BUILDING a community for one’s content is a goal, social media integration is a requirement.

While I have learned the consequences of requiring Twitter in a class,  I think it  or using Facebook or LinkedIn or YouTube will come more naturally here.

But, the content has to be there before you can share it.

Yes, this post is too long!

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11 Responses to “Here’s Why We Must Teach All Students HOW to Blog”

  1. Learning how to blog — the right way « Teaching Online Journalism Says:

    [...] George posted five solutions for blah blogs. I suggest you go and read [...]

  2. Here’s why we must teach all students how to blog « comm1030 Says:

    [...] of Alabama, posted this helpful information on his blog. I would encourage you to read it. http://bamaproducer.wordpress.com/2012/02/12/heres-why-we-must-teach-all-students-how-to-blog/ Jim Stovall, a professor at the University of Tennessee, posted these tips on writing for the web. [...]

  3. Dr. Daniels will be proud this is under 350 words | Samford Crimson tip blog Says:

    [...] has a few suggestions and solutions for you. They are worth your time and consideration. The first two: SOLUTION #1: Remember you’re [...]

  4. Advancing the Story » Better blogging made easy Says:

    [...] Daniels, who teaches journalism at the University of Alabama, has broken the process down into five basic steps. The first and perhaps most critical step is to have an audience in mind when you write your blog, [...]

  5. Get your first blog post right « UOW Journalism Says:

    [...] links to five pointers drawn up by George Daniels that are well worth reading. McAdam’s and Daniels agree that a [...]

  6. alexbeaubien Says:

    [...] According to blogger Adam Westbrook, blogging is especially important for students studying journalism. Westbrook says that a student should work right away at trying to accumulate followers because it takes time. A journalism student should also blog as much as possible, not just the minimum required by his or her professor. [...]

  7. A Journalism Student’s Guide to Blogging | alexbeaubien Says:

    [...] According to blogger Adam Westbrook, blogging is especially important for students studying journalism. Westbrook says that a student should work right away at trying to accumulate followers because it takes time. A journalism student should also blog as much as possible, not just the minimum required by his or her professor. [...]

  8. Social Media and News | Kaely Levy Says:

    […] that certain bloggers may use social media to spread propaganda or to incite readers, but effective blogging can only grow with society and impart information and […]

  9. Social Media & News | Kaely Levy Says:

    […] certain bloggers may use social media to spread propaganda or to incite readers, but effective blogging can only grow with society and impart information and […]

  10. Produce fan-worthy content and get noticed online | Asieg Says:

    […] However, before you start blogging, read University of Alabama assistant dean Dr. George Daniels’ five solutions to becoming a better blogger. […]

  11. Blog Post 4 | Katherine Mahumed Says:

    […] The most important part of developing an online presence, as both McAdams and veteran TV journalist George Daniels, is spending the time online blogging and writing – immerse […]

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